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Fixings

Making Sense of Fixings

Metex have removed the guesswork from choosing a fixing by offering a ‘fixing or hook for every application’. We have an unrivalled range of plasterboard fixings, dot and dab wall fixings, wall plugs, picture hooks & hangers.

Cobra wall anchors are the leading manufacturer of wall fixings in North America and Canada and are exclusively distributed in the UK by Metex. Corefix, our own patented ‘Dot & Dab’ fixing from Metex complements the Cobra range.

Metex fixings are available through a wide network of reputable stockists.

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Problems

There is a vast and bewildering range of wall fixings available with little information to answer the following questions: Will the fixing work with my wall type? Will the fixing support the weight of my item? Will the fixing work with the item?

Choices

Fixings from Metex simplify the decision making process through education by showing the compatible wall materials and safe working load for each fixing, allowing the user to make an informed and confident purchase.

Solutions

The Corefix & Cobra product range is designed to give the user a wide choice of fixings for all wall types and confidence to install the fittings and fixtures you need to finish the job, whether this is creating a wonderful bespoke interior or completing a commercial installation.

Metex Fixings Overview

The Corefix and Cobra ranges offer an unrivalled range of plasterboard fixings, dot and dab wall fixings, wall plugs, picture hooks & hangers.

Corefix is ideal for fixing heavy items such as TVs, radiators or kitchen cabinets to dot and dab plasterboard walls with a safe working load of 100kg in masonry blockwork. Its unique steel core transfers the load to the blockwork behind the plasterboard, preventing the plasterboard from crushing into the void.

From the wide range of Cobra wall fixings and hooks you can find the right fixing for any wall or application, from plasterboard to wood or concrete, heavy duty items to picture frames as well as many self-drilling fixings which only require a screwdriver to install.

Introducing Cobra Fixings

Cobra Anchors are the leading wall fixings manufacturer in the USA and Canada and distribute internationally.  Cobra products demonstrate true unrivalled innovation and technical excellence.

Within the range are dedicated wall & ceiling hooks to hang pictures, mirrors, wall art and plants,  allowing the user to purchase a single item in the knowledge that they will complete the job without looking for other hardware.

Find our range of Cobra fixings HERE and Cobra wall & ceiling hooks HERE.

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Fixings FAQs

+ What is a drylined wall?

A drylined wall is a solid masonry wall that has been faced with plasterboard, typically supported on blobs of adhesive (dot and dab). The plasterboard is spaced away from the masonry leaving a void behind much of the plasterboard.

Drylined walls can be found in most modern or extended houses. To determine what kind of wall you have, you can tap them; drylined walls will generally sound hollow and in certain places will give off a duller sound, indicating the location of an adhesive blob (dab) or a timber batten.

To be certain, you may need to drill a small hole though the plasterboard; with drylining you will normally find a void behind the plasterboard and solid masonry at a depth of between about 20-40mm.

+ What is a stud wall?

A stud wall or stud work wall – is where a wooden frame is constructed to create the room partitions and the plasterboard is then attached to the framework. This is often favoured in upper floors of houses as it reduces cost and simplifies the supporting wall requirements at ground level because it is much lighter. Corefix is not suitable for Stud Walls because there is no solid wall behind the plasterboard for Corefix to attach to.

+ What is a hollow wall?

In the UK a hollow wall means “a masonry wall with an air space between the inner and outer wall.” This is also known as a cavity wall or a hollow masonry wall.

However in the USA, a hollow wall is their term for a plasterboard stud wall or a dot and dab wall. That is an internal wall made up of a plasterboard face – air space – brick or block wall. The phrase "hollow wall" is creeping into the English language (mainly via the internet) so you might see the term "hollow wall anchors" referred to in connection with internal stud wall / dot and dab wall fixings.

+ What is a hollow wall anchor?

Based on the UK definition of a hollow wall, then a hollow wall anchor would be a fixing that secures a load to a hollow or cavity wall. But as the term "hollow wall" has started to become used to describe what is more accurately a dot and dab or stud wall, then the term hollow wall anchor has also become extended to cover rawl plugs as well.

For this reason, it is important that when fixing to an internal wall you use the correct fixings for the job in hand and logically before you can determine the best fixings to use you need to understand what type of wall you are fixing into! See the FAQs below for the difference between a stud wall and a dot and dab wall – the future of your shiny new wall mounted TV might depend on it!

+ What is a drywall anchor?

This is a term used to describe plasterboard wall fixings.

The commonly used rawl plug and screw is a classic example, but for a more secure and safe fixing the Corefix solution is hard to beat. This is because, unlike the rawl plug and screw solution, Corefix bridges the gap between the plasterboard and the solid wall behind it, so ensuring that the load is spread between the plasterboard and the solid wall.

This means that Corefix can safely support heavy loads – 100kg (independently tested) and over 200kg in-house tested.

+ Is the correct term raw plug or rawl plug?

The correct term used for the fixing used for attaching heavier objects to plasterboard walls is the rawl plug. The rawl plug got its name from John Joseph Rawlings who invented this simple yet universally used fixing way back in 1911. The basic concept is that these plugs fit in a drilled hole and enable a screw to be securely fixed into material that is either porous or brittle or that would otherwise not support the weight of the item.

+ How do I check if I have a stud wall or dot & dab wall?

It’s important to understand this so that you can use the correct fixing for the safe fixing of loads. Here are a few clues to help you determine what sort of wall you are dealing with if it has a plasterboard finish.

  • Unless your property has a timber frame construction, the ground floor walls, even internally, are almost certainly going to be of a dot and dab construction.
  • Dot and dab walls always sound less ‘hollow’ if you tap them.
  • Dot and dabs walls are typically thicker as there has to be a solid wall plus the void behind the plasterboard and the plasterboard itself.

The common term used for the fixing used for attaching heavier objects to these types of wall such as shelves, televisions, radiators and all manner of cupboards and units is the rawl plug – not a raw plug as it is often mistakenly called. This covers a multitude of different styles of which Corefix is just one and you may also come across terms such as wall plug / wall anchor and drywall anchor.

+ How can I check for wires or pipe locations before drilling?

We would recommend using a wire and pipe detector, although care should be taken as these may not detect plastic pipes where used. Typically, wires should run either horizontally or vertically to switches or sockets.

+ Why choose Corefix?

Corefix is not reliant on the strength of the plasterboard - instead it transfers the load directly to the solid masonry behind via the steel core. Most traditional fasteners used for dot and dab walls impart a point loading on the plasterboard, which, when the screw is tightened, crushes the plasterboard into the void, potentially damaging the wall finish and visually distorting the wall.

+ How has Corefix been tested?

Corefix has been rigorously tested in house and also by an independent test laboratory, and has been proven to safely support huge loads. The recommended safe load of 100kg (4 x fixings) includes a conservative Factor of Safety (see datasheet for further details).

+ How do I install Corefix?

Corefix can be installed extremely quickly without specialist tools or drill bits. All that is needed is a 10mm masonry drill, hammer and screwdriver.

Simply drill the hole through the plasterboard and into the solid wall behind, ensuring the total depth is a minimum of 100mm, remove any dust or debris from the hole before gently tapping the Corefix plug into place until the flange sits against the plasterboard. Tap the steel core home until flush with the plug, then install your bracket using the supplied screw. For more information, please refer to the videos and datasheet.

+ Can Corefix be used with lightweight aerated concrete blocks?

Corefix has been independently tested with lightweight concrete blocks and has shown excellent tensile and sheer values. The recommended safe load of 73kg (4 x fixings) includes a conservative Factor of Safety (see datasheet for further details).

+ Can Corefix be used with other wall boards/materials?

Due to its unique construction, Corefix is ideal for a range of wall boards as the steel core transfers the load directly to the solid masonry behind. Other materials that it can be used in conjunction with include fibreboards and insulated plasterboard. Corefix is ideal for use with a range of solid wall constructions, including blockwork, brick, stone and concrete.

+ Will Corefix still work when the void behind the plasterboard is greater than 10mm?

Corefix bridges the cavity with steel and is suitable for use with voids up to 25mm (excluding plasterboard thickness).

+ What size screw is supplied with Corefix?

Corefix 100 is supplied with a countersunk 5.0 x 100 screw as standard. The screw is 100mm long and 5mm across the maximum diameter of the threads with the head maximum diameter being 10mm.

Corefix 120 is supplied with a countersunk 5.0 x 120 screw as standard. The screw is 120mm long and 5mm across the maximum diameter of the threads with the head maximum diameter being 10mm.

+ What can be secured to a wall using Corefix?

Corefix is suitable for almost any wall hung object, including very heavy items. It is particularly suited to shelves, wall cabinets, wall hung TVs, boilers, radiators and hand rails.

+ Can I fix my flat screen TV to a dot & dab wall?

This will depend a lot on what is behind your plasterboard wall and what fixings you are going to use. If you are dealing with a plasterboard dot and dab wall, wall then you will have no problems at all in fixing your flat screen TV to the wall using the Corefix product (and providing you follow the instructions of course.)

Corefix is designed to provide a rock solid fixing into these types of internal walls. In fact Corefix has been independently tested to 100kgs loading* and has safely held 250kg in our own internal tests*. It is highly unlikely your TV will weigh more than 40kg (even the Samsung 75” TV we weighed was only just over 30 kg.)

+ Why do you not recommend Corefix for cantilever installations?

Corefix is extremely robust and able to support huge loads, however care must be taken with cantilever brackets as the combination of a heavy item on this type of arm increases the forces on the wall significantly. Therefore when cantilever brackets are used tests should be conducted to determine security of fixing, regardless of wall construction or fixing type used.

+ What is the difference between Corefix 100 and Corefix 120?

Corefix 100 (red) is the standard go to fixing for installations where the fixture thickness is up to 10mm (e.g. metal brackets). Independently tested safe working load of 100kg on 4 x fixings.

Corefix 120 (yellow) has a longer 120mm screw for securing fixtures of up to 30mm deep (eg wooden battens). Independently tested safe working load of 100kg on 4 x fixings.

All Corefix fixings have high load ratings and performance and are suitable for use in all types of brick and block, including lightweight/aircrete blocks.

+ How much weight will Corefix support?

Corefix is a true heavy duty fixing designed specifically to secure heavy loads to dot and dab walls, safely. Corefix has been independently tested to handle a loading of 100* kgs but our own in-house tests show that Corefix will securely support a staggering 250* kgs. To put that into context a 75 inch flat screen TV will be less than 40kgs.

*using 4 Corefix fixings.

+ Can I fix my boiler & radiator to a dot & dab wall?

If your plasterboard wall is of the dot and dab wall type, then definitely yes you can fix your boiler and radiators to that plasterboard wall if you use the right type of plasterboard fixings and for us that means Corefix.

Corefix has been specifically designed to provide a safe, secure fixing into these types of internal walls. To give you more peace of mind, Corefix has been independently tested to 100kg loading and has safely held 250kg in our own internal tests. So Corefix is without doubt the right fixing for this job.

Unlike inferior plastic versions, Corefix has a steel core and this transfers the load from the plasterboard to the solid blockwork or masonry material behind the plasterboard, so whilst other frame fixings claim to perform the same role they can severely distort or crush the plasterboard into the void – not what you want when your boiler is dependent on them holding secure!

+ Can I fix my kichen cabinets to dot & dab wall?

This is going to depend on the type of plasterboard wall you are dealing with and the quality of the plasterboard fixings to be used. If your plasterboard wall is a dot and dab wall, then yes definitely you can fix your kitchen wall cabinets to that wall, but only if you use the correct type of wall fixings and for that we recommend Corefix.

Corefix has been independently tested to 100kg safe working load and in our own internal tests has safely held a whopping 250kg. How can Corefix do this? Because these fixings have been especially designed to provide a secure fixing into exactly these types of internal walls. Of course, other frame fixings will claim to perform the same role but unlike these inferior plastic versions, Corefix has a steel core which transfers the load from the plasterboard to the solid blockwork or masonry material behind the plasterboard. This is what prevents the load can severely distorting or crushing the plasterboard into the void – which is what is likely to happen over time with the other inferior fixings. Not what you want when your kitchen wall unit is full of your best crockery – a gift from the mother in law!

+ What are the best plasterboard fixings?

This depends on what you have behind your plasterboard.

The best plasterboard fixing to use, if you have masonry behind the plasterboard and need to support a heavy weight, would be the Corefix fixing. Corefix – unlike other typical rawl plug based fixings – will bridge the gap between the plasterboard and the solid wall behind it. This means the load is spread and it’s not just the plasterboard itself taking the strain. As a result you will get a very strong, safe fixing. Corefix has been independently tested to a load of 100kg and has been in-house tested and proven to safely support over 200kg!

However, if you have no masonry behind the plasterboard, such as in timber stud walls, you'll need heavy duty plasterboard fixings that hook directly behind the plasterboard. For this we recommend our Cobra range of fixings.

+ What are the best fixings to use for dot & dab walls?

The best fixings to use for a dot and dab wall, where a heavy load is going to need to be supported, would be the Corefix fixing. This is because Corefix – unlike other typical rawl plug based fixings – will bridge the gap between the plasterboard and the solid wall behind it, thus spreading the load and ensuring a strong safe fixing. Also, Corefix has been independently tested to a load of 100kg and has been in-house tested and proven to safely support over 200kg!
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